Provider group slams labor board rulings

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An assisted living group says that two recent National Labor Relations Board rulings will lead to higher costs for seniors and fragmented services.

The Assisted Living Federation of America says that the first case the NLRB ruled on, known as Specialty Healthcare, makes it possible for workers of different classifications to be represented by multiple unions within the same long-term care facility.

“The NLRB continues to produce unprecedented decisions that alter carefully balanced rules that employers have followed for years. The changes resulting from the decisions will make serving seniors more complex and expensive with no benefit to anyone except big unions,” said ALFA CEO Richard P. Grimes, in a statement.

ALFA also objects to the board's decision to overturn a 2007 ruling that allowed an immediate challenge to a union after a card-check vote, and let employees have a secret-ballot vote when an employer voluntarily recognized a union.

“ALFA believes that the secret ballot election is the gold standard, as the NLRB has recognized in the past, and we disagree with any decisions that would limit or remove employees' rights to make an informed choice in an official, NLRB-supervised secret ballot election,” Grimes added.

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