Provider group hails delay of labor board's notice posting requirement

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A senior living group welcomed a decision by a U.S. appeals court to grant an injunction blocking implementation of the National Labor Relations Board's notice posting rule.

Scheduled to go into effect April 30, the contentious NLRB rule would have required employers to display posters informing workers of their right to unionize. But two groups, the National Association of Manufacturers and the Coalition for a Democratic Workplace, asked the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit for an injunction after a federal district judge dismissed the case a month ago. An appeal of this decision is pending.

The Assisted Living Federation of America, which has been vociferous in its opposition to this rule, praised the decision, saying that the NLRB lacks the authority to enforce the requirement.

“The posting requirement rule is a one-sided initiative that would have prevented employees from making informed decisions about all of their rights under the National Labor Relations Act,” ALFA President and CEO Richard Grimes said in a statement. 

The injunction follows a similar decision last week by U.S. District Judge David Norton, who ruled that the NLRB exceeded its authority in issuing the requirement.

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