Proposed IPAB repeal would benefit seniors, House lawmaker says

Share this article:

A bipartisan group of legislators introduced a bill in the House of Representatives Wednesday to repeal the Medicare Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB) called for by the Affordable Care Act.

This is the latest attempt by House lawmakers to abolish IPAB, which critics derided as a “death panel” in debates over healthcare reform. An IPAB repeal bill passed two House committees in March, but Democratic support for the measure eroded in part because the repeal was linked to medical malpractice legislation. The current bill, introduced by Reps. Phil Roe (R-TN) and Allyson Schwartz (D-PA), has bipartisan support. However, it's unclear whether it would gain any traction in the Senate.

IPAB would have the authority to set Medicare reimbursement policy, subject to congressional approval, if costs exceed benchmarks. Though Medicare costs are unlikely to exceed these thresholds before 2023, Roe said IPAB could “intervene in the doctor-patient relationship” and repeal would be “what's right for our seniors.”

Share this article:

More in News

$1.3 million settlement marks second recent deal over SNF supervision of therapy providers

$1.3 million settlement marks second recent deal over ...

A Maryland nursing home company has agreed to a $1.3 million settlement over charges that it did not prevent overbilling by its contracted therapy provider, federal authorities announced Monday. This ...

MedPAC chairman: Three-day stay requirement is 'archaic'

The government should pay for skilled nursing care without a preliminary three-day hospital stay, and the recovery auditor program should be reformed, Medicare Payment Advisory Commission members said at a meeting Friday.

Nursing homes can't carve out billing, collections in arbitration agreements, AR Supreme ...

A nursing home arbitration agreement largely reserved the provider's rights to sue residents while limiting residents' legal options, causing it to fail a "mutual obligation" requirement, the Arkansas Supreme Court recently ruled .