Program reduces pressure ulcers by 30%

Share this article:

Techniques and processes promoted by the New Jersey Hospital Association's "Pressure Ulcer Collaborative" decreased pressure ulcer incidence by nearly one-third, officials announced last week.

The NJHA's Quality Institute first set up the special pressure ulcer panel a year ago. After six months of sharing preventive practices and best practices tips, a pilot group of facilities reported a 30% drop in pressure ulcer incidence.

"These preliminary results are promising and show that when communicating and working together, caregivers can learn from each other and improve patient outcomes," said Aline Homes, NJHA senior vice president of clinical affairs.

Leading experts and top national figures on resident safety and pressure ulcers discussed and recommended protocols. Pilot program participants focused on proper repositioning of residents who spend long periods in beds or wheelchairs; better observation; wound drainage; appropriate use of wet and dry dressings; and antibiotics to prevent infection when necessary.

About a third of the 125 nursing homes, hospitals and home care agencies in the collaborative took part in the pilot program. It tracked data from December 2005 through May 2006.
Share this article:

More in News

'Minor' issues at the nursing home can cause disastrous care transitions, expert warns

'Minor' issues at the nursing home can cause ...

What may appear to be minor administrative problems in a nursing home - a fax machine locked away at night or no one designated to copy paperwork - can cause ...

Long-term care facilities approach 80% worker flu vaccination rate after handing power ...

Fourteen long-term care facilities in Pennsylvania dramatically increased their staff flu vaccination rate by having a regional pharmacy take over the process, according to a report issued Thursday by the Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research (AHQR).

RACs were 'most improved' healthcare auditors for getting back money in 2013, ...

Medicare Recovery Audit Contractors dramatically stepped up their overpayment recoveries last year, returning nearly $487 million more to the government than they did in 2012, according to a new report from a federal watchdog agency.