Pest control owner faces possible imprisonment, million-dollar fines for services at Georgia nursing homes

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The owner of a pest control company faces charges of improperly using a pesticide in nursing homes and engaging in a cover-up, which could result in prison time and stiff fines, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

Bio-Tech Management Inc., owned by Steven Murray, provided improper services to Georgia nursing homes between 2005 and 2009, the indictment states. The company allegedly used Termidor, a pesticide, indoors more often than twice a year, contrary to instructions on the label. Murray instructed workers to alter reports after the Georgia Department of Agriculture began an investigation, according to the charges.

In addition to one count of conspiracy, 10 counts of making false statements, 10 counts of unlawful use of a pesticide and 20 counts of falsifying records, Murray and Bio-Tech face 10 counts of mail fraud, for allegedly billing nursing home clients for these improper pesticide treatments through the U.S. mail.

Each count of mail fraud and falsifying records carries a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine, according to the DOJ. Each false statements charge carries a maximum five-year prison sentence and a $250,000 fine.

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