Panel sees line blurring between skilled care and assisted living services

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The line separating assisted living and skilled care services continues to blur, according to panelists who spoke Wednesday at the Assisted Living Federation of America's 2012 conference and expo near Dallas.

“The profile of assisted living residents is changing and they now need increasing assistance,” said Ginger Landy, director of ALFA's New York chapter.

 “I don't see a bright line that separates when a resident should move from an assisted living setting to skilled care, “ added Stephanie Handelson, president and COO of Benchmark Senior Living. She said residents should receive care in the most appropriate setting, regardless of how the building is classified.

Their comments came during a session titled, “When assisted living and public policy collide; the future of aging in place.” John O'Connor, editorial director for McKnight's, moderated the event.

While panelists called for an expanded role for assisted living operators in delivering aging in place services, they agreed that poor communication with state regulators could hinder such efforts.

ALFA's annual meeting continues today. The event has already attracted more than 1,000 AL operators and approximately 250 vendors.


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