Operators must embrace technology to reduce staffing costs, experts advise

Share this article:
Operators must embrace technology to reduce staffing costs, experts advise
Operators must embrace technology to reduce staffing costs, experts advise
Nursing homes can survive recent Medicare and impending Medicaid cuts by embracing the use of technology to reduce staffing costs, said experts in a McKnight's webinar Thursday.  

Jeff Amann, vice president of operations at American Baptist Homes of the Midwest, said that staffing is long-term care facilities' biggest cost, and implementing efficient staffing technologies can provide an operator with the biggest savings. Implementing Internet-based staffing software helped Amann identify overtime hours as a key area of improvement.

“When we looked at overtime costs, we found up to 12% overtime costs in one building,” Amann said. “Industry-wide it's probably less than that, but that's pretty significant.”  

He also advised administrators to talk to their schedulers, and make sure they know what their budget is.   “Schedulers spend a lot of time calling people to fill shifts. Can some system or product minimize that task?” he added.  

Mark Woodka, who is the CEO of OnShift, which sponsored the webinar, estimates that a 1% reduction in overtime hours per year can save a facility between $24,000 and $60,000 per year.   “If you are over-staffed, it can be hard to tell people not to come in, but you have to look seriously at that,” Woodka said.
Share this article:

More in News

Double homicide at Houston nursing home; victims' roommate arrested

Double homicide at Houston nursing home; victims' roommate ...

A double murder occurred late Tuesday night in a Houston nursing home room shared by four men, according to local authorities. Police arrested Guillermo Correa on suspicion of beating two ...

$2 million HIPAA settlement highlights mobile device risks facing healthcare providers

Laptops and other mobile devices containing personal health information have been stolen from long-term care ombudsman programs and other healthcare organizations, including from Concentra Health Services and QCA Health Plan Inc. Now, Concentra and QCA have agreed to legal settlements totaling nearly $2 million, federal ...

Long-term care nurses often 'scramble' to get family members' blessing for palliative ...

Nursing home residents might not transition to full palliative care until they are very near death, at which point nurses and family members act in a state of crisis, suggests recently published research out of Canada.