OIG: Hospitals err 18% of the time with point-of-admission indicators

Share this article:
Urinary tract infections, pneumonia and blood infections were among the top developing conditions given inaccurate detection indicators when Medicare patients were admitted to the hospital, a government report finds.

A lack of uniformity among hospital coders for developing conditions is a main reason for the “point of admission” errors, according to a Monday report from the Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General.

The investigators reviewed nearly 700 claims that included almost 5,500 POA indicators and discovered 180 POA errors. That mean nearly 1 in 5 (18%) experienced an error. They also found cases where the indicators were not correct for a patient with a chronic condition, such as diabetes or congestive heart failure.

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid requires POA indicators in order to distinguish which problems appeared after being admitted, such as hospital-acquired infections, which may change the reimbursement amount given to a hospital.

Click here to see the report.

Share this article:

More in News

Nursing home antipsychotic use has dipped nearly 19% under national effort, latest figures show

Nursing home antipsychotic use has dipped nearly 19% ...

The percent of long-stay nursing home residents receiving antipsychotic medication has decreased 18.8% under a nationwide initiative that started in 2012.

Jimmo succeeds in getting Medicare coverage, two years after landmark case ended

Glenda Jimmo has reached a settlement with the federal government and will finally receive Medicare coverage for claims that were denied in 2007, which led her to file a class-action lawsuit over the so-called "improvement standard."

Breier named new CEO at Kindred

Breier named new CEO at Kindred

Kindred Healthcare announced Thursday that it has chosen a new top executive to lead its push toward creating a mammoth national brand. Benjamin A. Breier, the company's current president and ...