OIG: Antipsychotics use rarely compliant

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Sen. Charles Grassley
Sen. Charles Grassley
An overwhelming percentage of nursing facilities reviewed were not compliant with regulations regarding residents who take atypical antipsychotic medications, according to a recent federal report.

More than 99% of the 375 records examined were not in compliance for at least one reason, according to the Office of the Inspector General.

The announcement provoked protest from the provider community, which cited the relatively small study sample size and the criteria used.

According to the OIG, 99% of the records reviewed did not show compliance with requirements for care plan development and one-third did not comply with rules regarding resident assessments.

Plus, 18% of the records had no evidence to indicate planned interventions for antipsychotic drug use occurred, while 4% of records showed nursing staff didn't document consideration of the resident assessment protocol.
The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has targeted antipsychotic overuse this year.
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