Obese beneficiaries weigh down Medicare, study finds

Share this article:
Overweight seniors cost more under Medicare than their thinner counterparts, a new study finds.

The journal Health Services Research found that, over the course of their enrollment in the Medicare program, heftier seniors required an additional $15,000 to $26,000 worth of treatment than those beneficiaries at a healthy weight. Researchers at Emory University interpreted the data collected from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey from 1992 to 2001 to determine the relationship between a senior's weight and his or her medical expense requirements.

A separate recent study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that seniors in general are among the skinniest subset of the adult population. An average of 25.6% of all adults are reported as being obese, compared to 19.4% of seniors over 70, according to that report.

Share this article:

More in News

Rape investigation blocked by nursing home's HIPAA concerns, authorities say ...

Florida authorities say a nursing home is citing privacy laws to impede the investigation of a possible resident rape, according to local news reports.

Jury hands down $14 million negligent care verdict to 'send message' to nursing homes

Jury hands down $14 million negligent care verdict ...

A Massachusetts jury has awarded $14 million to the family of a nursing home resident who died due to a pressure ulcer, dehydration and other conditions linked to negligent care, ...

CCRC executive director salaries hold steady, therapy directors get boost

Continuing care retirement community executive director salaries have barely increased in the past year, while therapy and rehabilitation directors received a boost, a new report shows. The average salary for a therapy and rehab director is currently $95,905.