Obama administration has missed half of health law's legal deadlines, report claims

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The Department of Health and Human Services missed roughly half of its legal deadlines for implementing the Affordable Care Act, a new report from a right-leaning advocacy group asserts.

An analysis conducted by the American Action Forum found that HHS missed 20 of the 42 statutory deadlines since the passage of the 2010 healthcare reform law, including a deadline for the jettisoned long-term care insurance program. Implementation of The Community Living and Retirement Security Act, or CLASS, was shelved last fall when the Obama administration concluded that the controversial program was financially unworkable.

As a report in The Hill noted, HHS has for the most part met its statutory deadlines for the higher profile provisions of the ACA, such as state insurance exchanges. Deadlines for other programs — such as the insurance exchanges and Money Follows the Personhave stalled due to resistance from Republican governors who believe the ACA will be found unconstitutional, according to The Hill.

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