Nursing

Nursing home nurses seek hospital transfers guidance

Nursing home nurses seek hospital transfers guidance

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A comprehensive review of nursing homes nurses' perceptions about emergency room transfers shows nurses want more resources and more guidance to determine who goes and who stays.

Shift workers could be accident prone

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More than a third of night-shift workers were involved in near-crashes in an after-work test drive, researchers reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Nurses like paychecks, but would gladly change jobs

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Despite reporting relative satisfaction with their salaries, many nurses would still pursue a different line of work if they could, a new survey shows.

RN retirement wave is on its way: analysis

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Close to two-thirds of registered nurses over age 54 are currently considering retirement, a November report by AMN Healthcare found.

Study: Healthcare workers not making healthy choices

Study: Healthcare workers not making healthy choices

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Doctors, nurses and other healthcare workers don't always practice what they preach when it comes to living a healthy lifestyle, a new study suggests.

Mid-morning may be best break time: study

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The best time of day to take a break is mid-morning, according to a new study from Baylor University.

Study refutes the notion that longer nurse shifts are better

Study refutes the notion that longer nurse shifts are better

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Nurses who work long shifts may experience job dissatisfaction and a risk of burnout, according to new research.

ANA: 'zero tolerance' for bullies at work

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A leading long-term care nurses group is praising the American Nurses Association's new "zero tolerance" policy regarding violence and bullying in healthcare workplaces.

New nurses on night and OT shifts face higher injury risk

New nurses on night and OT shifts face higher injury risk

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Newly licensed nurses who work overtime and night shifts have an increased risk of occupational injuries, a new study has found.

ANA pushing for universal immunizations

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All healthcare workers and nurses should be immunized against vaccine-preventable diseases, the American Nurses Association advised in late August.

Nurses support bill targeting healthcare worker violence

Nurses support bill targeting healthcare worker violence

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A state bill in Massachusetts geared toward preventing healthcare workplace violence has garnered support from nursing advocates.

Health workers show LGBT bias: study

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Healthcare workers may be biased regarding the sexual orientation of their patients, according to researchers from the University of Washington.

How's moving patients risky? OHSA is counting the ways

How's moving patients risky? OHSA is counting the ways

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A new key hazard list from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration highlights the injury risk healthcare workers face when handling patients.

LTC staff spend only half of time on care

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Long-term care nurses spend more than half of their time completing tasks that don't involve resident care, according to new research in the Journal of Nursing Studies.

Study sheds light on dangers of working second, third shifts

Study sheds light on dangers of working second, third shifts

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Workers whose hours fall outside of a traditional 9-to-5 schedule may be more susceptible to sleep- and weight-related health issues, according to a new study from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health.

Bill would require RN on duty at all times

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The American Nurses Association recently announced its support for a bill that could require nursing homes to have a registered nurse on duty around the clock, every day of the week.

Yet another teamwork benefit: Workplace infections go down

Yet another teamwork benefit: Workplace infections go down

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Healthcare-associated infection rates are reduced when nurses and physicians work collaboratively, according to an analysis by New York researchers.

Nursing diversity improves ... but slowly

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Though nursing's ranks are becoming more diverse, there's still much work to be done to make it reflective of the U.S. population.

Male RNs out-earning female colleagues

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Female nurses may outnumber male nurses 10 to 1, but men in the profession still make more per capita, according to a report published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in March.

Inability to bathe may signal additional problems to come

Inability to bathe may signal additional problems to come

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Bathing disability is a "sentinel" event in the disabling process, one that deserves more attention as nurses and other long-term care staff seek to alleviate the associated emotional and physical discomforts.

Ask the Nursing Expert ... about patient-centered care

Ask the Nursing Expert ... about patient-centered care

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The National Quality Forum recently declared, "Person- and family-centered care emphasizes the inclusivity of recipients of healthcare services and their families and caregivers.

Case could change nursing meal breaks

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A California court case concerning waived breaks could have widespread implications for healthcare workers encouraged to give up meal time during extra-long shifts.

Nurse-directed intervention eases heart disease, diabetes

Nurse-directed intervention eases heart disease, diabetes

Having primary care nurses promote physical activity could be effective enough to reduce heart disease and Type 2 diabetes risk among seniors, according to a British study.

Ask the Nursing Expert about ... CPR

Ask the Nursing Expert about ... CPR

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How is the decision made whether a resident should be resuscitated?

Ask the Nursing Expert ... about hospital readmissions

Ask the Nursing Expert ... about hospital readmissions

Is it true we will be hit by cuts in reimbursement and penalized by Medicare for high percentages of hospital readmissions based on the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014, or PAMA?

Night shift work a risk factor for diabetes?

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The more years black women spend working the night shift, the higher their risk for developing diabetes, according to a new study in Diabetologia.

Study explores rural nursing challenges and opportunities

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Rural facilities with higher ratios of RNs are associated with better outcomes, but the right staffing mix might be difficult to achieve.

Nurses are most respected, new poll finds

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An annual Gallup poll finds nurses are among the most respected American workers, based on their honesty and ethical standards.

Nurses' English skills may be impeding care, study shows

Nurses' English skills may be impeding care, study shows

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About 15% of U.S. long-term care nurses say their English language proficiency or accent creates communication problems with residents, family members and other medical providers, according to recently published findings.

Night shift schedules threaten waistline

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Employees such as nurses and CNAs who work overnight are likely burning less energy than those on a normal schedule, putting them at increased risk for obesity, according to new study results.

Landmark ethics report calls for widespread adjustments

Landmark ethics report calls for widespread adjustments

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A team of nurses and leaders specializing in clinical ethics has issued an "unprecedented" report on the ethical issues facing the profession.

Degreed DONs found to be more valuable

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Nursing homes with highly educated, certified directors of nursing have better outcomes on some key quality measures, according to recent findings.

Study cites staffing increase as injury-reduction strategy

Study cites staffing increase as injury-reduction strategy

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Higher nurse-to-patient ratios result in fewer job-related injuries and illnesses, according to research that measures the effects of a 10-year-old California law.

Flexible work, pressure ulcer rates linked

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Nursing homes where staff had more control over scheduling registered lower rates of pressure ulcers among residents, according to a study published in the Journal of Applied Gerontology.

More than 1 in 3 nurses leave first job by third year: study

More than 1 in 3 nurses leave first job by third year: study

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Nearly 18% of new nurses leave their first job within a year, according to a study in Policy, Politics & Nursing Practice.

Empower NPs, reduce hospitalizations

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Maximizing the authority of nurse practitioners is associated with reduced hospitalization of skilled nursing facility residents, according to findings recently published in Nursing Outlook.

Let there be light for better nurse health, patient care

Let there be light for better nurse health, patient care

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Creating workspaces with natural light could improve nurses' job performance and health, Cornell University researchers believe.

Philosophy good for nurses, study says

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Philosophical awareness is not only relevant to nurse education but "vital," according to researchers from the University of Victoria in Canada.

Nursing homes may benefit from delayed RN retirements

Nursing homes may benefit from delayed RN retirements

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Nursing homes may benefit from registered nurses working longer after age 50, researchers from RAND Corporation say.

Survey: Nurses under dangerous stress

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A lack of necessary authority and problems with management are contributing to nurses' high levels of stress, according to recently released survey results.

Advancing Excellence now embraces nurses in policy

Advancing Excellence now embraces nurses in policy

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Nurses' efforts to be leaders in a national effort to improve long-term care showed how they can attain greater influence over healthcare policy, according to an article recently published in Geriatric Nursing.

Oregon tops list of best states for nurses

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With a supportive work environment and plenty of opportunity, Oregon took first in a 2014 ranking of the best and worst states for nursing.

Expanded role empowering yet stifling for many nurses

Expanded role empowering yet stifling for many nurses

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Efforts at reducing rehospitalization of nursing home residents can empower nurses, but such initiatives can also put them in challenging positions, according to study results published in the May issue of Research in Gerontological Nursing.

Veteran nurses struggle to make grade

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Registered nurses with a lot of experience might have a harder time in graduate school than less seasoned nurses, according to a first-of-its-kind pilot study from California State University-San Marcos.

Residents reciprocate when nurses initiate warm regards

Residents reciprocate when nurses initiate warm regards

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Relations between long-term care nurses and residents can be understood through the concept of "reciprocity," and cultivating certain types of reciprocity can improve care, according to recent research out of the University of South Australia.

Lighter work is little help for retention

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Engaging late-career nurses in special projects while reducing their load of physically or psychologically demanding tasks can improve their perception of managers, but it doesn't improve retention. This was one takeaway from a large-scale initiative in Ontario, according to findings recently published in the Journal of Nursing Management.

Survey says 'faking' feelings may bring on nurse burnout

Survey says 'faking' feelings may bring on nurse burnout

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Nurses who don't have a natural ability to control their emotions and who feel like they're regularly "faking" feelings at work are more likely to experience burnout, depression and be absent, according to recently published research in the International Journal of Nursing Studies.

AMDA to allow NPs, physician assistants as full members

AMDA to allow NPs, physician assistants as full members

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The American Medical Director's Association has a new name and will now allow nurse practitioners and physician's assistants full membership.

Physical demands on CNAs differ by shift

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Certified nursing assistants who work in long-term care are put in severe postures for their shoulders and elbows at night, and for their neck during the day, according to a new study.

Zinc, hand washing lead to cold prevention

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As long-term caregivers wind down winter and its accompanying illnesses, a new review indicates that hand washing and zinc might help prevent the common cold.

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