Nursing homes confront new challenges with younger residents

Share this article:

The numbers of nursing home residents under the age of 65 has grown 22% in the last eight years. This is largely due to the closing of mental health facilities and medical advances that help individuals survive traumatic illnesses and injuries, The Washington Post reported.

Patients between the ages of 31 and 64 account for 14% of the nursing home population, according to an independent analysis by National Public Radio. This presents a challenge to nursing home operators. Younger residents can feel more frustrated by being surrounded mostly by residents much older than them, which can cause social tensions and impact depression. Likewise, older residents complain about loud music younger residents listen to, and an influx of younger visitors.

Some operators have overcome this by setting aside separate wings for younger residents. Activity directors in some places are taking younger residents on outings to nightclubs, and replacing bingo nights with poker nights for younger residents, the Post reported.

Share this article:

More in News

Long-term care leaders need self-awareness, partnerships to avoid the 'Founder's Trap,' CEO panel advises

Long-term care leaders need self-awareness, partnerships to avoid ...

Strong leaders must be vigilant or they could stifle a company's innovation and growth, a CEO panel said Monday at the 2014 LINK LTC and Senior Living Conference in Chicago.

County nursing home weighs heroin addict plan

An Ohio county is evaluating whether 20 beds at its nursing home could be dedicated for heroin addicts during their withdrawal, according to local reports.

Coaching sessions reduce hospital readmissions, study finds

An hour-long educational coaching session and up to three follow-up phone calls reduced readmissions by 39% among Medicare patients, a new study finds.