Nursing home workers receive $2.6 million in back pay from jobs lost during strike

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National Labor Relations Board officials were scheduled to deliver roughly $2.6 million in lost benefits and pay to 133 nursing home workers who had been involved in a strike more than a decade ago.

During the 1999 strike at the Avery Heights nursing home in Hartford, CT, the company, Church Homes, began to hire permanent replacements for the 180 striking workers, according to a local NBC report. After the strike was settled, the company only took back those members whose positions had not been filled—78. The union sued, and the company's actions were deemed illegal.

Recently, the U.S. Supreme Court allowed that lower court ruling to stand. The ruling said that Avery Heights violated labor laws by hiring permanent replacements for the striking workers. A representative from the National Labor Relations Board was scheduled to visit some of the nursing home workers on Tuesday to deliver checks ranging from $55 to $65,000, The Associated Press reported.

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