Nursing home workers receive $2.6 million in back pay from jobs lost during strike

Share this article:

National Labor Relations Board officials were scheduled to deliver roughly $2.6 million in lost benefits and pay to 133 nursing home workers who had been involved in a strike more than a decade ago.

During the 1999 strike at the Avery Heights nursing home in Hartford, CT, the company, Church Homes, began to hire permanent replacements for the 180 striking workers, according to a local NBC report. After the strike was settled, the company only took back those members whose positions had not been filled—78. The union sued, and the company's actions were deemed illegal.

Recently, the U.S. Supreme Court allowed that lower court ruling to stand. The ruling said that Avery Heights violated labor laws by hiring permanent replacements for the striking workers. A representative from the National Labor Relations Board was scheduled to visit some of the nursing home workers on Tuesday to deliver checks ranging from $55 to $65,000, The Associated Press reported.

Share this article:

More in News

Hospitals in the Midwest refer patients to the broadest networks of skilled nursing facilities, study finds

Hospitals in the Midwest refer patients to the ...

Midwestern hospitals spread referrals to the greatest variety of skilled nursing facilities and tap their favorite SNFs least often, according to a recently published analysis of nationwide referral patterns.

Bill would affect pay, scheduling for some nursing home housekeeping staff

Nursing homes could face more stringent scheduling requirements for housekeeping workers and might be on the hook to compensate them for last-minute shift changes under a bill proposed in both houses of Congress.

Joint Commission adds memory care accreditation

New memory care accreditation for nursing homes encourages staff to use a flexible, problem-solving approach to care for those with dementia, according to Joint Commission guidelines.