Nursing home study finds high rate of community-associated MRSA

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Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (CA-MRSA) was discovered in nearly 91% of nursing homes tested in a recent study.

University of California-Irvine researchers acquired samples from more than 2,200 nursing home residents in Orange County, CA. They detected CA-MRSA in 20 of 22 nursing homes where testing occurred between 2008-2011.

Most infection control measures related to CA-MRSA have been undertaken by hospitals, but this study shows nursing homes should also pursue interventions to prevent the spread of the drug-resistant bacteria, the researchers said.

"We believe these at-risk facilities could benefit from further infection control interventions, such as enhanced environmental cleaning or skin decolonization," said lead researcher Courtney R. Murphy, Ph.D.

Nursing homes with a higher number of mobile residents saw more cases of CA-MRSA, suggesting that programs designed to increase resident interaction need to also take infection management into account.

The report appears in the March issue of Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology.

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