Nursing home quality measures should address short-stay rehab residents, group says

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The set of quality measures used on Medicare's Nursing Home Compare website should be updated to include more measures for short-stay rehabilitation residents, according to one panel of experts. The Nursing Home Compare program measure set contains a mix of process and outcome measures for safety and prevention of mortality, but there are some gaps, according to a new report from the Measures Application Panel (MAP).

Long-term care facilities are increasingly adding rehabilitation services and units. In reviewing finalized measures for Nursing Home Compare, MAP “suggests that the measure set incorporate additional measures for short-stay residents to reflect the increase of this type of nursing home care,” the report states. “To promote alignment across programs, potential short-stay measures should align with measures selected for use in inpatient rehabilitation facilities.”

The panel also suggested adding measures that address patient experience.

MAP is convened by the National Quality Forum to advise the Department of Health and Human Services on the enforcement of quality measures in healthcare systems. Click here to read MAP's full report.
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