Nurses more committed to current position during recession, study finds

Share this article:
Salaries for nursing home administrator and nursing directors rise modestly in 2012, survey shows
Salaries for nursing home administrator and nursing directors rise modestly in 2012, survey shows
While the recession led to the perception of fewer jobs for new registered nurses, it also led to increased loyalty to employers, a new study reveals.

Overall job satisfaction did not improve between 2006, when a group of newly licensed RNs were interviewed, and 2009, when the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation surveyed a different batch of RNs. The burgeoning economy means that some of the nurses who stayed in their current jobs will consider retirement or another change, said lead investigator Christine T. Kovner, RN, Ph.D.

“As the recession eases and the job market opens up again, it's likely that nurses who have been delaying changing jobs will begin looking for new positions, which could dramatically increase staff turnover," Kovner, RN, Ph.D., said, adding that healthcare organizations should consider working conditions and wages in order to boost retention.

The study was published in the March issue of the American Journal of Nursing.
Share this article:

More in News

Hospitals in the Midwest refer patients to the broadest networks of skilled nursing facilities, study finds

Hospitals in the Midwest refer patients to the ...

Midwestern hospitals spread referrals to the greatest variety of skilled nursing facilities and tap their favorite SNFs least often, according to a recently published analysis of nationwide referral patterns.

Bill would affect pay, scheduling for some nursing home housekeeping staff

Nursing homes could face more stringent scheduling requirements for housekeeping workers and might be on the hook to compensate them for last-minute shift changes under a bill proposed in both houses of Congress.

Joint Commission adds memory care accreditation

New memory care accreditation for nursing homes encourages staff to use a flexible, problem-solving approach to care for those with dementia, according to Joint Commission guidelines.