Nurse hirings up between 2001 and 2003, study says

Share this article:

The number of nurses hired at hospitals and other healthcare facilities between 2001 and 2003 jumped to nearly 205,000, one of the largest nurse-hiring spikes since before Medicare was implemented in 1965, according to a recent survey.

Researchers from Vanderbilt University School of Nursing analyzing data from a Census Bureau employment survey also found that nurses age 50 and older accounted for 63% of those hired during the two-year period. In addition, hiring of nurses age 50 and older increased at an average annual rate of about 20% between 2001 and 2003.

However, the study report published in the Wall Street Journal suggests that the nursing shortage in this country remains "far from resolved. Researchers cite increasing numbers of retiring nurses and the aging baby boomer population as likely threats to the shortage of nurses in the coming decades.

The demand for registered nurses is expected to increase to 2.8 million by 2020 from, 2 million in 2000, according to statistics from the Bureau of Health Professions.

Share this article:

More in News

Nursing home antipsychotic use has dipped nearly 19% under national effort, latest figures show

Nursing home antipsychotic use has dipped nearly 19% ...

The percent of long-stay nursing home residents receiving antipsychotic medication has decreased 18.8% under a nationwide initiative that started in 2012.

Jimmo succeeds in getting Medicare coverage, two years after landmark case ended

Glenda Jimmo has reached a settlement with the federal government and will finally receive Medicare coverage for claims that were denied in 2007, which led her to file a class-action lawsuit over the so-called "improvement standard."

Breier named new CEO at Kindred

Breier named new CEO at Kindred

Kindred Healthcare announced Thursday that it has chosen a new top executive to lead its push toward creating a mammoth national brand. Benjamin A. Breier, the company's current president and ...