Norovirus vaccine proves effective in human tests, researchers say

Share this article:

Clinical tests indicate that a potential norovirus vaccine is highly effective in reducing symptoms of the infection, researchers have announced.

The study involved 98 people who drank water dosed with norovirus, 50 of whom received the injected vaccine, according to the Infectious Diseases Society of America. The researchers involved, led by David I. Bernstein, M.D., M.A., presented their findings at last week's IDWeek 2013 conference.

Among those who received the vaccine, 26 people were infected, the researchers said. In the other group, 29 people were infected. However, only 10 people who were vaccinated developed mild, moderate or severe vomiting and/or diarrhea, compared with 20 people in the placebo group. This means the vaccine achieved a 52% reduction in symptoms.

People in nursing homes are at high risk for norovirus and could benefit from the vaccine if further testing confirms its effectiveness, stated Bernstein, who is affiliated with Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and the University of Cincinnati.

Long-term care facilities bore the brunt of a norovirus outbreak that began a year ago, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Share this article:

More in News

Assisted living communities continue to make a terrible first impression on prospective customers, university program finds

Assisted living communities continue to make a terrible ...

Assisted living communities consistently do not make a good first impression with prospective customers, and they haven't improved this skill set in the last decade, according to data from George ...

Latecomers to hospice frequently are male, have certain cancers, Penn researchers find

Men and patients with certain types of cancer are among those less likely to enroll in hospice, suggesting that healthcare providers should focus on presenting these groups with all their end-of-life care options, according to newly published findings.

Nursing homes should think twice before using a well-known tool for diagnosing ...

A familiar tool for diagnosing depression in dementia patients might not be very effective in the nursing home setting, according to findings recently published in The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.