Non-adherence to medications increases seniors' risk for falls: study

Share this article:

Seniors who neglect to take their medications as directed can significantly increase their risk of falls, according to new research.

A recent study of Boston-area seniors found that those who occasionally neglected their medications were 50% more likely to fall than those who took their medications as directed. Researchers at the Institute for Aging Research at Hebrew SeniorLife in Boston surveyed 246 men and 408 women with an average age of 78 for the study. Of the seniors in this group, 376 reported experiencing a combined total of 1,052 falls. 

Low adherence to medication schedules is easy to screen for, according to researchers. The seniors surveyed for the study answered simple questions such as, “Do you ever forget to take your medications?” and “Are you careless at times about taking your medications?” Nearly half—48%--did not fully adhere to their medication schedule, according to the report. The article appears in the latest edition of the Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological and Medical Sciences.

Share this article:

More in News

Double homicide at Houston nursing home; victims' roommate arrested

Double homicide at Houston nursing home; victims' roommate ...

A double murder occurred late Tuesday night in a Houston nursing home room shared by four men, according to local authorities. Police arrested Guillermo Correa on suspicion of beating two ...

$2 million HIPAA settlement highlights mobile device risks facing healthcare providers

Laptops and other mobile devices containing personal health information have been stolen from long-term care ombudsman programs and other healthcare organizations, including from Concentra Health Services and QCA Health Plan Inc. Now, Concentra and QCA have agreed to legal settlements totaling nearly $2 million, federal ...

Long-term care nurses often 'scramble' to get family members' blessing for palliative ...

Nursing home residents might not transition to full palliative care until they are very near death, at which point nurses and family members act in a state of crisis, suggests recently published research out of Canada.