NLRB proposes rules for faster unionization timelines

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Collaboration and communication important for ACO partnerships, LINK panel says
Collaboration and communication important for ACO partnerships, LINK panel says

The National Labor Relations Board proposed new rules Tuesday that would shorten the lag time between a union petitioning for an election and holding a secret-ballot vote.

It's not known how many days would be shortened in the election process. The NLRB said it proposed the new rules to make sure that unions, employers and employees receive election information earlier in the unionization process. The regulations also would tend to push litigation on voter-eligibility issues until after an election, according to The New York Times.

The proposal comes on the heels of organized labor's attempts to make inroads into the long-term care industry. Long-term care has become a prime target for unionization in recent years.

Union leaders said the current time period between petitioning and voting — which as of 2008 was an average of 57 days — gives employers too much time to persuade employees against unionizing. According to the unions, managers show workers anti-union videos and approach employees for one-on-one talks to discourage unionization, according to the newspaper. But companies counter that a shortened period would make it harder to discuss the disadvantages of unionizing.

Republicans and business groups are upset with the board's proposals because, they say, it shows that President Obama is doing favors for organized labor, which they assert is bad for business, according to the paper.

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