Nighttime urination may increase risk of death among elderly, new study suggests

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Frequent nighttime urination, or nocturia, is common among elderly people, but recent research has linked it to a heightened risk of death.

Researchers in northern Japan interviewed 788 people aged 70 or older to discover their nighttime urination habits. After adjusting the data to account for factors such as diabetes, blood pressure and alcohol consumption, researchers found that those who urinated two or more times during the night were 2.7 times more likely to have died during a three-year follow-up period than those who urinated less often. The results of the study were presented at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association in Chicago on Sunday.

While the research didn't come up with an explanation for the correlation, experts say it is a reminder that nocturia should be evaluated and treated. Other recent research tied the condition to heart disease-related mortalities and increased likelihood of falls. Disrupted sleep could reduce functionality and overall alertness during the day, leading to accidents or health problems, researchers also suggest.
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