Report: Pressure sores on the decline among nursing home residents

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Protein change explains why pressure ulcers are 'not entirely preventable' among seniors, researcher
Protein change explains why pressure ulcers are 'not entirely preventable' among seniors, researcher

The percentage of nursing home residents with pressure sores has fallen over the last decade, according to a newly released report from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

 

Both long- and short-stay nursing home residents saw improvements in rates of pressure sores, according to the report. Among short-stay patients, the rate fell from 22.6% in 2000 to 18.9% in 2008. The percentage among long-stay patients fell from 13.9% in 2000 to 11.7% in 2008. Short-stay residents typically have higher rates of pressure ulcer than long-stay residents, often because they are admitted to a nursing home in order to help treat a pressure sore that developed in an acute-care setting, experts note.

The AHRQ report also found that the percentage of long-stay nursing home residents who require help with activities of daily living has generally held steady since 2000.  But while the overall percentage remained at 16.2% between 2000 and 2008, the percentage of long-stay residents up to 64 years old needing help with ADLs did increase from roughly 10% to 12%. AHRQ is an agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.