Reader poll: What do you wear to work, and why?

Collected during the 2015 American Health Care Association/National Center for Assisted Living convention in San Antonio and LeadingAge annual meeting in Boston.

“Exactly what I'm wearing now [a tie, dress shirt, black pants]. I wear this every day except Friday, which is casual.” 

— Zach Ziesemer, NHA, Executive Director, Willowdale Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, New Holstein, WI 

“I wear scrubs. My favorite bottoms are Kois. I love them — I have 10 to 12. I always wear a necklace with my grandmother's wedding ring and grandfather's birthstone.”

— Mandie Sprock, RN, Director of Nursing, Palisade Healthcare Community, Garretson, SD

“I love a performance shirt that doesn't need ironing. I don't like ironing at all. I generally wear khakis.”

— Joe Lilienthal, Administrator, Glacier Care Center, Cut Bank, MT

“Generally dress slacks or a suit. It seems like it's changing and it's becoming more casual.” 

— Margie Ignarski, NHA, Executive Director of Business Administration, Fortis Management Group, Chippewa Falls, WI

“If I'm speaking, I will wear a suit. If I'm going to a nursing home, I will dress as they dress. I try to blend in. But I never wear jeans, even on dress-down days. I want my client to be proud they hired me, but I also want them to be comfortable.”

— Pamela Bibeault, RNC, MS, NHA, CLNC, Principal, Triad Health Care, Providence, RI

“We wear uniforms, with any color top and a white bottom. White pants can get dirty, but I've been there 27 years and it's always been that.” 

— Helen Duncan, Licensed Practical Nurse, Kingsbridge Heights Rehabilitation and Care Center, Bronx, NY

“A sportcoat and slacks, and
cufflinks. It looks professional when I interact with customers and staff.”

— Adam Nielsen, Vice President, Great Lakes Caring Home Health, Jackson, MI

“Care staff wear a blue top and a black bottom, and sometimes I wear that. If you are out of uniform, it's business professional. You are always ready.”

— Grace Knott, PT, GCS, Rehab Services Administrator, Hillcrest Health Services, Bellevue, NE

“A lab coat with pockets full of essentials for the day, including the day's newspaper to target orientation with residents, tongue depressors, suckers, balloons, penlight, crackers and applesauce for working with dysphagia patients. Also, cute shoes because all of the ladies love them!” 

— Renee Kinder, MS, CCC-SLP RAC-CT

Clinical Specialist, Evergreen Rehabilitation, Louisville, KY