Family pushing for class action lawsuit against provider Revera

The family of a resident who died following a stay at a Canadian nursing home is hoping others will join in a $200 million lawsuit against a provider.

Ross Jones died of “sepsis and suspected pneumonia” in 2011 after an 11-month stay at Main Street Terrace in Toronto, according to the suit announced by his daughter, Lori DeKervor, on Thursday. The complaint claims Jones suffered from dehydration and malnutrition, and had a pressure ulcer that went untreated and became infected.

"He died a painful 13th century death, while being looked after by a giant business entity that is making a ton of money on the basis of its promise to deliver reliable, professional health care to our parents," DeKervor said in a press release.

The suit asks for $200 million in damages for DeKervor and any future complainants from provider Revera, which operates nearly 80 long-term care facilities and almost 130 retirement communities across Canada. The complaint also alleges the company conducted inadequate investigations into complaints, and failed to meet government care standards.

While Jones' daughter is the only complainant currently listed in the suit, the family's attorney, Amani Oakley, believes more will join.

"We found quite a number of instances of cases of Revera residents being injured, being left unattended, being allowed to fall,” Oakley told CBC News.

John Beaney, spokesman for Revera, said the company can't comment on specifics of the suit, but that it believes the case has no merit and plans to defend itself in court.

“We provide care to lots of individuals, often at the end of their lives and families are part of that process,” Beaney told the Toronto Star. “When a resident passes away it is often the result of a combination of factors. It is not simple … and this can often make it very difficult for their loved ones.”

Twenty-four Revera facilities were acquired by United States-based Genesis HealthCare in a $240 million deal last year.