New oral medication shows promise for more quickly treating MRSA skin infections, researchers find

Share this article:

A new oral antibiotic may effectively treat MRSA-related skin infections more quickly than the only oral drug currently approved, according to research published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Researchers led by Philippe Prokocimer, M.D., the chief medical officer at Trius Therapeutics Inc., compared the effectiveness of tedizolid phosphate with linezolid. Linezolid is the only oral medication currently approved to treat certain skin infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA).

The acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (SSSIs) caused by MRSA can be fatal, and there have been outbreaks of linezolid-resistant strains of MRSA, the researchers noted.

In a 667-person trial carried out in North America, Latin America and Europe, participants received either a daily dose of tedizolid phosphate for six days or a dose of linezolid every 12 hours for 10 days.

Based on clinical outcomes, the researchers determined the newer drug is “clinically noninferior” to linezolid.

Nursing homes experience a high rate of community-associated MRSA, according to a study in the March issue of Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology.

Share this article:
close

Next Article in News

More in News

Genesis, Skilled Healthcare merger to create huge long-term care provider with more than 500 facilities

Genesis, Skilled Healthcare merger to create huge long-term ...

Genesis HealthCare and Skilled Healthcare Group Inc. will merge to create a single long-term and post-acute care company with more than 500 facilities nationwide, the providers announced Tuesday.

Antipsychotic use tied to acute kidney injury, increasing pressure on nursing home ...

Older people who take antipsychotic medications are at a markedly increased risk of acute kidney injury, according to newly published research findings out of Canada. The study further supports ongoing efforts to reduce the number of nursing home residents on these drugs.

Family alleges long-term care facility banned them due to social media posts, ...

Family members of a Texas long-term care resident have sued the facility where she lives, claiming they were banned from visiting due to their social media posts, according to a publication covering legal proceedings in the state.