New nursing grads face rough job market

Share this article:

Job prospects for recently graduated nursing students aren't nearly as plentiful as they were a few years ago, according to recent reports.

Economic hardships are prompting many would-be employers of new nursing talent to turn to older, more experienced nurses for their recruitment needs, the Star-Telegraph reported. Hospitals and other healthcare entities are also forgoing usual expansion projects, which tightens up the job market even further, according to the Philadelphia Inquirer. Despite the dearth of nursing jobs currently available, the overall nursing shortage still looms, with some estimates still placing the number of nurses needed at 250,000 over the next 15 years.

As recently as 2008, the job market for nurses was dramatically different. Signing bonuses, flat-screen TVs and job-satisfaction guarantees were de rigueur for many healthcare facilities looking to attract new talent. (McKnight's, 9/16/08).


Share this article:

More in News

Long-term care continues to lead in deal volume and value: PwC report

Long-term care continues to lead in deal volume ...

Long-term care bucked healthcare industry trends with strong merger and acquisition activity in the second quarter of 2014, according to newly released data from professional services firm PricewaterhouseCoopers.

Empowering nurse practitioners could reduce hospitalizations from SNFs, study finds

Granting more authority to nurse practitioners is associated with reduced hospitalization of skilled nursing facility residents, according to recently published findings.

Pioneer ACO drops out of program, despite reductions in skilled nursing utilization

A California healthcare system has become the latest dropout from the Pioneer Accountable Care Organization program, despite reducing skilled nursing facility utilization and improving its readmission rates. Sharp HealthCare announced its decision in a quarterly financial statement released Tuesday.