New findings about broken hip, stroke risks

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People who break their hip are 50% more likely to have a stroke within a year of the injury compared to similar individuals without fractures, according to a new Taiwanese study.

American researchers, however, caution that hip fractures and strokes are not matter of cause and effect.

"This new study makes me think that both hip fractures and strokes are partly due to an underlying cause of aging," a U.S. researcher told the news service Reuters.

Investigators in Taipei, Taiwan, found that of 256 patients who suffered a stroke over the course of a year, 4.1% had previously suffered a hip fracture, compared with 2.7% who had not, Reuters reported. The study was published in the journal Stroke. It is already known that suffering a stroke raises the risk of breaking your hip--not the reverse.
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