MRSA rates dip amid changes

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Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus rates are falling in both healthcare facilities and in communities, suggesting a change in how MRSA is being transmitted and prevented, a cohort study finds.

In addition to skin and soft tissue infections, the study looked at bacteremia that was caused by community-onset MRSA. Researchers found a 31% decline in cases among military healthcare recipients corresponded to a drop in hospital-acquired bacteremia caused by MRSA.

Findings were published in the July 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.
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