Mother-daughter nursing home execs agree to lifetime Medicaid ban in case of $3 million fraud

Share this article:

Former Florida nursing home executives agreed to be “permanently excluded” from federally funded health programs in settling charges of a $2.75 million Medicaid fraud, according to a plea agreement signed June 5.

Defendants Maxcine Darville and her daughter, JoAnne Carter, withdrew their previous not guilty plea and entered a plea of no contest to grand theft charges, the settlement states. The deal included four years of felony probation and more than $100,000 in combined restitution.

Darville and Carter were arrested in January for allegedly spending Medicaid funds on personal expenses such as luxury cars, mortgage payments, maid service and utility bills, Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi said in a news release.

Prior to their arrest, the Attorney General's Office had investigated the mother-daughter duo for allegations made between January 2006 and March 2012 that Medicaid payments to their nursing home management company, the Council on Aging of Florida, were used for personal expenses, the news release noted.

Two of the nursing homes they owned received the “lowest-possible one-star rating from state regulators” and another was put on a "watch list with a conditional license", The Palm Beach Post reported. The plea deals still have to be approved by a judge, according to the newspaper.

Share this article:

More in News

Bulk of Medicaid to be managed care in two years: Avalere

Bulk of Medicaid to be managed care in ...

More than three-quarters of Medicaid beneficiaries will be enrolled in a managed care plan as of 2016, according to an Avalere Health analysis released Thursday. The numbers reveal that managed ...

Nursing home asked for employee's personal information too often, jury rules

The human resources department of a Maine nursing home did not properly protect a former employee's personal identification information, a jury recently ruled.

Test could confirm sepsis within an hour

Nursing home residents might benefit from a new way of diagnosing and treating sepsis made possible by discoveries out of the University of British Columbia.