More than one-third of nation's nursing homes sign up for Advancing Excellence campaign, organizers say

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Health Affairs journal devotes January issue to long-term care
Health Affairs journal devotes January issue to long-term care

The second phase of recruitment for the Advancing Excellence in America's Nursing Homes campaign wrapped up on Sunday. Organizers reported that 5,860 nursing homes across the country have signed up for the initiative.

A few states managed to recruit all or nearly all of their nursing homes, according to a statement about the initiative. South Dakota and Arkansas reported 100% of nursing homes participating in the campaign. Georgia recruited 99.4% of its homes, while South Dakota and Rhode Island recruited 95.4% and 94.2% respectively. But when it comes to sheer numbers, Ohio took the lead with 389 homes. California was close behind at 382 homes, and Georgia took third with 357 homes.

That so many nursing homes signed up for the campaign—roughly one-third of the nation's nearly 16,000 homes—is evidence that nursing homes are committed to continuous quality improvements, organizers said. The purpose of the campaign is to encourage, assist and empower nursing homes to improve the quality of care and life for residents. Members of the campaign include long-term care facilities, medical professionals, consumers, employees and state and federal agencies.


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