More meds mean more falls for seniors

Share this article:
Seniors who take four or more prescription medications have two to three times the risk of falling as seniors who take fewer meds, according to researchers at the University of North Carolina. Some of those drugs, the researchers say, may actually contribute to the risk of falling.

Some common antidepressants, seizure medications and painkillers have made the list, according to lead study author, Dr. Susan Blalock. These types of drugs all depress the nervous system, leading to slower response times and a lessening of coordination, especially among seniors, according to the report. Study results are published in the latest issue of the American Journal of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy.

Researchers recommend that, should a senior discover they are taking one of the meds mentioned on the list, they continue taking the medication until discussing possible side effects and falls risk with their physician. They also suggest that doctors prescribe alternative medications with less sedating effects and that pharmacists be on the look-out for seniors who are taking four or more medications, and to alert those who are to the risks.
Share this article:

More in News

CMS expands therapy payment research

The government is expanding its research into alternative therapy payments, to consider more holistic changes to the way Medicare reimburses skilled nursing facilities, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services announced Tuesday.

CDC tightens Ebola guidelines for healthcare workers

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued more stringent guidelines for how healthcare workers should interact with Ebola patients, following an outcry from nurses and other professionals.

Nonprofit providers face alarming market forces, must rally, LeadingAge chairman says

Nonprofit providers face alarming market forces, must rally, ...

Nonprofit long-term care providers must work together to address alarming trends, or their market share could plummet and the sector as a whole could falter, LeadingAge Chairman David Gehm told ...