Minority caregivers dismiss symptoms of Alzheimer's, study finds

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Blacks and Hispanic caregivers are more likely to dismiss symptoms of Alzheimer's disease as part of the normal aging process, compared to caregivers of other races, according to a new study by the Alzheimer's Foundation of America.

The results help explain why there may be a delay in diagnosis and treatment in these population groups, according to Eric J. Hall, CEO of the AFA.

A total 37% of black caregivers and 33% of Hispanic caregivers surveyed said they believed Alzheimer's disease to be a normal part of the aging process. That compares to less than than 25% of caregivers of other races. The study surveyed 655 people currently caring for a loved one with Alzheimer's disease. Black and Hispanic caregivers also were significantly more likely to dismiss the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease as old age, compared to respondents of other races.

Additional survey findings are available at www.alzfdn.org.
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