Minnesota e-prescription requirement ignores nursing homes

Share this article:
Minnesota's ambitious program requiring healthcare providers to write electronic prescriptions to prevent expensive errors leaves one group of providers out in the cold: nursing homes.

The state's long-term care ombudsman, Deb Holtz, says she is concerned that poor handwriting and transcription errors has led to numerous deaths in nursing homes, according to the Star Tribune. Additionally, state nursing home operators say it's not uncommon for nursing home staff to make multiple calls per day to reconcile illegible handwritten prescriptions from physicians, the paper reports.

While the state of Minnesota does not keep track of nursing home prescription mistakes, the National Academy of Sciences estimated in 2006 that there are 800,000 medication-related injuries in skilled nursing facilities each year.

"Everybody knows people die from poor handwriting and transcription errors," Holtz told the newspaper. “How is it we're trying to practice 21st century medicine with 1950s technology?"

Share this article:

More in News

Nursing home antipsychotic use has dipped nearly 19% under national effort, latest figures show

Nursing home antipsychotic use has dipped nearly 19% ...

The percent of long-stay nursing home residents receiving antipsychotic medication has decreased 18.8% under a nationwide initiative that started in 2012.

Jimmo succeeds in getting Medicare coverage, two years after landmark case ended

Glenda Jimmo has reached a settlement with the federal government and will finally receive Medicare coverage for claims that were denied in 2007, which led her to file a class-action lawsuit over the so-called "improvement standard."

Breier named new CEO at Kindred

Breier named new CEO at Kindred

Kindred Healthcare announced Thursday that it has chosen a new top executive to lead its push toward creating a mammoth national brand. Benjamin A. Breier, the company's current president and ...