MFP program struggling

Share this article:

The government's so-called “Money Follows the Person” program has had a disappointing start, officials announced recently.

Designed to allow elderly and disabled individuals greater flexibility in choosing their sources and sites of healthcare, the program has failed to reach participation goals, regulators said. 

Places such as the District of Columbia (11% of the goal participants), Virginia (35%) and Maryland (55%) are indicative of how the participating 43 states have experienced a lack of users. That said, in Maryland, 87% of program participants have come from nursing homes, officials said. 

Only $1 billion of the $4 billion Congress authorized for the program through 2016 has been used, officials at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services noted.

Fewer than 23,000 individuals nationwide had transitioned to community settings from institutional healthcare settings as of late October, according to CMS. Officials there now admit their goal of transitioning more than 35,000 people within five years was unrealistic.

The program was expected to grow participation in home health care but in some places, there were shortages of workers and viable housing options for disabled participants. In other areas, home- and community-based care sites needed to be started from scratch. 



Share this article:

More in News

CDC issues new guidelines on pneumococcal vaccine, says LTC flu vaccination rates remain low

CDC issues new guidelines on pneumococcal vaccine, says ...

Long-term care workers continued to have low rates of flu vaccination last season, despite there being 92% vaccination coverage overall among physicians and nurses, the Centers for Disease Control and ...

AL operators accused of withholding $2M in unpaid overtime, minimum wages ...

Four California assisted living operators are facing eight felony charges related to wage theft, tax and insurance violations, according to local reports.

Three states to examine risk, reform in Medicaid project

Alabama, Washington and Nevada are participating in a yearlong Medicaid project that could help share risk between states and the federal government, the National Governors Association said this week.