Meditation reduces cardiovascular incidents, study finds

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Transcendental meditation is more effective than health education in reducing heart attacks and strokes among African-Americans with heart disease, new research reveals.

Almost half of the 201 study participants were women with an average age 59. Many members of the study took cholesterol-lowering drugs, smoked or were obese.

Half the study subjects went to a health education class focused around diet and exercise and lifestyle modification, while the others practiced meditation for twice a day for 20 minutes.

The latter group was more likely to see their blood pressure drop and reported reduced amounts of smoking. Those who meditated were less likely to die or experience a heart attack or stroke, the investigators found. 

The results of the study, conducted by the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, were published Tuesday in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes

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