Medicare accepting new codes for transition care

Share this article:
As part of an effort to improve coordination among different care settings and reduce rehospitalizations, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services is now accepting two new codes related to transitional care.

The codes – 99495 and 99496 – are for reporting the management of patients recently discharged from hospitals or skilled nursing facilities. In urging the CMS to accept the new codes, the American Medical Association said they will make it easier for care providers to participate in integrated care models such as accountable care organizations.

“Medicare's acceptance of the new codes signals that CMS recognizes the important role these services have in improving the overall quality of health care,” said AMA President-elect Ardis Dee Hoven, M.D. “The decision supports the work involved in transitioning patients from one care setting to the next and physicians working in emerging models of care.”

Better care coordination among hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, hospices and other providers can successfully reduce the rate of rehospitalizations in a community, according to a study published this week in The Journal of the American Medical Association.

Share this article:

More in News

Antipsychotics reduction goal is 25% by end of 2015, CMS and provider groups announce

Antipsychotics reduction goal is 25% by end of ...

Long-term care providers are being asked to reduce the use of antipsychotic medications among residents by 25% by the end of 2015, and 30% by the end of 2016. Providers ...

CDC issues new guidelines on pneumococcal vaccine, says LTC flu vaccination rates remain low

CDC issues new guidelines on pneumococcal vaccine, says ...

Long-term care workers continued to have low rates of flu vaccination last season, despite there being 92% vaccination coverage overall among physicians and nurses, the Centers for Disease Control and ...

AL operators accused of withholding $2M in unpaid overtime, minimum wages ...

Four California assisted living operators are facing eight felony charges related to wage theft, tax and insurance violations, according to local reports.