Medical directors push for LTC-specific physician training, quality measures

Share this article:

Nursing facility medical directors should receive more training specific to long-term care, according to the American Medical Directors Association.

Residents of long-term care facilities often present particularly complex cases for clinicians, involving multiple chronic conditions, cognitive and functional loss and other debilities and illnesses. As a result, more investment is needed in training for medical directors of these facilities and physicians practicing in the LTC continuum, AMDA said in a letter to the Congressional Commission on Long-Term Care.

AMDA said it is developing a comprehensive framework laying out the competencies needed to practice post-acute and long-term care medicine. The association said these competencies go beyond the currently mandated certification requirements, which involve training in internal and family medicine and geriatrics.

The government's clinical quality measures, which are in development, also are a concern.

“Many of the current clinical quality measures (CQMs) developed for the Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS), Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) and other similar programs were not written for, and in many cases do not meet the clinical needs of, the PA/LTC settings,” the letter states.

AMDA urged the commission to recommend CQMs more tailored for long-term care in its report to Congress.

The commission's report will be released by the end of September, and will include recommendations to Congress on how to reform the U.S. long-term care payment and delivery systems. The 14-member panel accepted comments from the public through Aug. 27.

Click here to access the complete AMDA Aug. 26 letter.

Share this article:

More in News

Hospitals in the Midwest refer patients to the broadest networks of skilled nursing facilities, study finds

Hospitals in the Midwest refer patients to the ...

Midwestern hospitals spread referrals to the greatest variety of skilled nursing facilities and tap their favorite SNFs least often, according to a recently published analysis of nationwide referral patterns.

Bill would affect pay, scheduling for some nursing home housekeeping staff

Nursing homes could face more stringent scheduling requirements for housekeeping workers and might be on the hook to compensate them for last-minute shift changes under a bill proposed in both houses of Congress.

Joint Commission adds memory care accreditation

New memory care accreditation for nursing homes encourages staff to use a flexible, problem-solving approach to care for those with dementia, according to Joint Commission guidelines.