McCain, Obama advisers discuss long-term care at symposium

Share this article:
Sen. John McCain (R-AZ)
Sen. John McCain (R-AZ)
Surrogates for presidential hopefuls John McCain (R) and Barack Obama (D) spelled out their respective nominees' views on the future of long-term care in the United States at the third annual Long-Term Care Symposium in Washington this week.

Healthcare policy advisers Jay Khosla (McCain) and Debra Whitman (Obama) both said their candidates view long-term care reform as a vital part of addressing critical issues facing the nation's healthcare system. Policy experts from the libertarian CATO Institute, the conservative Heritage Foundation, the centrist group Third Way and the liberal Center for American Progress also held a panel discussion on long-term care and healthcare reform.

Americans view long-term care as a significant issue, according to a poll from Genworth Financial, Inc., which sponsored the event. A total of 78% of voters believe the presidential candidates should put long-term care near the top of their healthcare platforms, and 83% say candidates' positions on long-term care will affect their vote.
Share this article:

More in News

Hospitals in the Midwest refer patients to the broadest networks of skilled nursing facilities, study finds

Hospitals in the Midwest refer patients to the ...

Midwestern hospitals spread referrals to the greatest variety of skilled nursing facilities and tap their favorite SNFs least often, according to a recently published analysis of nationwide referral patterns.

Bill would affect pay, scheduling for some nursing home housekeeping staff

Nursing homes could face more stringent scheduling requirements for housekeeping workers and might be on the hook to compensate them for last-minute shift changes under a bill proposed in both houses of Congress.

Joint Commission adds memory care accreditation

New memory care accreditation for nursing homes encourages staff to use a flexible, problem-solving approach to care for those with dementia, according to Joint Commission guidelines.