Many assisted living residents are Medicaid-dependent, government report says

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Nineteen percent of U.S. assisted living facility residents receive Medicaid benefits, and at least 43% of ALFs have at least one resident that is a Medicaid recipient, a new report reveals.

A lack of hard data about assisted living/residential care facilities led investigators from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to conduct a comprehensive survey of this part of the long-term care industry. Key findings of the CDC's research are related to the number of ALFs in the United States, ownership type, facility population, chain affiliation, the payer type for services, among others.

The report, titled “2010 National Survey of Residential Care Facilities,” reveals that there are 31,100 assisted living facilities in the United States that provide 971,900 beds. Roughly 50% of these facilities are considered small facilities (with 4-10 beds); 16% were medium sized (11-25 beds); 28% were large (26-100 beds); and 7% were ranked as extra large (more than 100 beds). There are substantially more beds for those over the age of 85 in the western U.S. states, the report says.

Click here to read the full report.
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