Long-term care nurse training, retention need boost, executive says

Share this article:

Finding and training qualified nurses remains one of the field's top challenges, the head of a top senior care nurses' group said Monday.

“It's hard to recruit. There's not enough faculty in nursing schools and it's very competitive now [to gain admission],” Robin Arnicar, RN, FACDONA, the president of NADONA told McKnight's yesterday at the group's annual meeting and conference in Las Vegas.

Residents and facilities would benefit if nurses were given more professional development options, Arnicar added. Licensed practical nurses, in particular, need more resources and instructors, Arnicar continued. As residents continue to get older and sicker, they are presenting more complex problems to healthcare professionals, she noted.

“We need to get back to good, solid assessments,” she noted. Reducing rehospitalizations, better wound treatments and dementia care were cited as top clinical challenges facing caregivers.


Share this article:

More in News

ACO bill in House would waive 3-midnight requirement for skilled nursing care

Certain Accountable Care Organizations would be able to send Medicare beneficiaries to a skilled nursing facility without a prior hospital stay under a bipartisan bill recently introduced in the House of Representatives.

Increasing staff-to-patient ratios improves nurse safety, researchers find

A law setting mandatory nurse-to-patient staffing ratios has reduced the number of workplace injuries for registered nurses and licensed practical nurses in California, according to recently published findings.

Life Care Centers takes Gold in Transitions category

Life Care Centers takes Gold in Transitions category

Life Care Centers of America has won the Gold Award in the McKnight's Excellence in Technology Awards in the Transitions category.