Life Expectancy

Biometric preening — dying is not good business

Biometric preening — dying is not good business

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For success in long-term care, you want your employees to stay well, and especially not dead. If it isn't already, that should probably be a primary component of your business plan. A dead staff member is notoriously unreliable, often not even having the courtesy to call in, finish tasks as assigned or complete a proper exit interview. So you need your people alive. It's just good business.

Should we all want to die at 75?

Should we all want to die at 75?

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Nursing homes would be put out of business if scientists discover how to stop the aging process, McKnight's Editorial Director John O'Connor wrote in his blog yesterday. But the reverse is also true: Nursing homes would find their beds empty if many seniors were to die earlier in life — because, say, they start refusing antibiotics for common infections, as Ezekiel Emanuel, M.D., Ph.D., plans to do once he turns 75.

Hope I die before I get (too) old

Hope I die before I get (too) old

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When it comes to life spans, we are the chosen ones.

Life expectancy: A reason to wipe that smile off your face

Life expectancy: A reason to wipe that smile off your face

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Even after a few weeks, it still seems like a bad joke. Maybe something pulled from the front page of The Onion, the satirical newspaper that has been lampooning revered subjects for years.

Online tool helps predict mortality

Mortality researchers have developed an online assessment tool that helps clinicians predict mortality for older adults.

Big future ahead for sub-acute healthcare providers offering continuum of care, researchers predict

Big future ahead for sub-acute healthcare providers offering continuum of care, researchers predict

The market for long-term care services is likely to grow at a rate of 5% to 6% per year, a new study finds. Healthcare market research publisher Kalorama estimates the long-term care market in 2010 was $258 billion in its new report, "Long Term Care Market: Nursing Homes, Home Care, Hospice Care, and Assisted Living."

Death rate down, life expectancy rate up, CDC report finds

In 2009, the average life expectancy of a baby born in the U.S. climbed to 78.2 years, according to the new National Vital Statistics Report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. At the same time, the death rate fell to an all-time low.

Study: U.S. healthcare system to blame for flagging life expectancy rates

Gains in life expectancy for U.S. citizens continue to lag behind those in other countries. Perhaps surprisingly, the usual suspects—obesity, smoking and other factors—are not the cause, according to a new study.