Laxton to lead American Medical Directors Association

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Christopher E. Laxton is leaving his post as president of the Life Services Network of Illinois to become executive director of the American Medical Directors Association in February, AMDA announced Tuesday. 
 

Laxton previously was Interim Chief Operating Officer at the Society for Biomolecular Sciences. He has served as CEO for a number of healthcare-related associations, including the American Association of Diabetes Educators and the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology.

Laxton took over at LSN in January 2010, months after long-time president Dennis Bozzi had departed to take a similar post in New York. Later that year, it was announced that LSN officials discovered Bozzi had misappropriated $670,000 in funds.

AMDA officials conducted a national search following the departure of Lorraine Tarnove, who led the group for 20 years before being abruptly dismissed last December. Transition consultant Harvey Tillipman has served as AMDA's interim executive director since January of this year. Tillipman worked with a special committee led by AMDA Immediate Past President Karyn Leible, M.D., RN, CMD, and current President Matt Wayne, M.D., CMD., on the executive director search.

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