Lawmakers throw timely support to organizations intent on decreasing falls

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Subcommittee Chairman Bernard Sanders (I-VT)
Subcommittee Chairman Bernard Sanders (I-VT)

A bipartisan group of senators succeeded Tuesday in passing S. Res 276, officially recognizing the first day of fall as, what else? National Falls Prevention Awareness day.

Investing in falls prevention programs could save billions of dollars in treatment costs, said Sen. Herb Kohl (D-WI), chairman of the Senate Special Committee on Aging. Falls are the most common reason seniors will need nursing home or rehabilitative care. Every year, roughly $19 billion is spent on treating falls in the United States, according to figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The resolution promotes support to a number of falls prevention organizations, including the National Falls Free Coalition, the National Council on Aging, and the National Safety Council.

Kohl was joined in Tuesday's announcement by Sens. Mike Enzi (R-WY), Barbara Mikulski (D-MD) and Bernard Sanders (I-VT), among others. Coincidentally, their colleague, Sen. Robert Byrd (D-WV), 91, suffered a fall in his Virginia home and was rushed to a local hospital Tuesday morning. Early reports indicated the senator did not sustain any serious injuries, but doctors suspect he may have an infection and are keeping him in the hospital for treatment and observation. He is the longest-serving U.S. senator in the history of the nation.


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