Late-onset Alzheimer's disease may be less aggressive, harder to detect

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Alzheimer's disease appears to progress more slowly in adults over 80, investigators have found. As a result, this type of late-onset Alzheimer's disease may be more difficult to detect and treat.

University of California researchers used data compiled by the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study to document the distinction.

Investigators noted that a more slowly developing form of the disease is less likely to be noticed by providers. That's largely because the symptoms of the disease may be less apparent at first, they said.

The study was published Aug. 2 in the online journal PLoS One.

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