Lack of geographic mobility among nurses hurts access

Share this article:
Lack of geographic mobility among nurses hurts access
Lack of geographic mobility among nurses hurts access
Nurses' lack of mobility — the relationship between where they received training and where they ultimately end up making their living — can lead to recruiting challenges, a study finds. This has the biggest implications for people living in rural areas, where there are already more problems with access to care, experts say.

Nursing homes and hospitals located in rural areas have a tough time recruiting registered nurses due to a relative lack of training centers, experts contend. Therefore, healthcare providers must rely heavily on locally trained registered nurses. This lack of geographic mobility is higher in nursing than for most other professions, according to researchers from New York University's College of Nursing.

According to the study, which was published in December's Health Affairs, More than half (53%) of newly licensed RNs work within 40 miles of where they attended high school. Among RNs with bachelor's degrees, 62% of those  aged 20 to 39 live in their state of birth, compared with 57% of comparable professionals in other fields.

Additionally, around two-thirds of RNs surveyed by NYU investigators were working within 100 miles of where they grew up.

“Given the strong tendency for nurses to practice close to where they attended nursing school and to attend nursing school near where they graduated high school, it's not surprising that parts of the country with few or no schools of nursing are struggling to find nurses,” said Christine Kovner, Ph.D., RN.
Share this article:

More in News

Genesis, Skilled Healthcare merger to create huge long-term care provider with more than 500 facilities

Genesis, Skilled Healthcare merger to create huge long-term ...

Genesis HealthCare and Skilled Healthcare Group Inc. will merge to create a single long-term and post-acute care company with more than 500 facilities nationwide, the providers announced Tuesday.

Antipsychotic use tied to acute kidney injury, increasing pressure on nursing home ...

Older people who take antipsychotic medications are at a markedly increased risk of acute kidney injury, according to newly published research findings out of Canada. The study further supports ongoing efforts to reduce the number of nursing home residents on these drugs.

Family alleges long-term care facility banned them due to social media posts, ...

Family members of a Texas long-term care resident have sued the facility where she lives, claiming they were banned from visiting due to their social media posts, according to a publication covering legal proceedings in the state.