Kindred Healthcare steps up its transition game

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Kindred Healthcare has announced plans to open new transitional care centers in Indianapolis and Las Vegas by 2014. The company will also open expanded transitional care hospitals in Dayton, OH, and Charleston, SC.

Both the Indianapolis and Las Vegas facilities will specialize in intensive short-term rehabilitation therapy, including cardiac and orthopedic rehabilitation.

The expansion comes at a time when large, for-profit long-term care facilities are targeting patients that until recently would have been likely found in hospital med-surg units. Clearly, Kindred and other large skilled care operators are prepping for a future in which acute care settings will be partners or competitors.

“We believe that our integrated care market strategy better clinically supports a patient's recovery through a full episode of care,” said company CEO Paul J. Diaz  He added that the new facilities respond “ to the growing interest among patients, physicians, hospital systems and public and private payers for high-quality, patient-centered integrated care.”

Kindred describes itself as “the largest diversified provider of post-acute care services in the United States.” The firm recently reported third-quarter net income of $7.5 million, or 14 cents per share. That compares to $1.7 million, or about 3 cent per share, for 12 months prior. Third-quarter revenue also rose, to $1.52 billion from $1.51 billion a year earlier.

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