Kaiser: Small savings possible in dual-eligible programs

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Attempts to better manage care for "dual-eligible" seniors produced a small savings, according to a study from the Kaiser Family Foundation.

The findings show that hopes for a significant decrease in government spending on patients eligible for both Medicare and Medicaid might not be realized.

A careful review of the evidence thus far suggests that generating modest net Medicare savings and better outcomes for dually eligible beneficiaries is possible, but will require tailoring, targeting, and monitoring,” report authors wrote. “Taken together, these studies provide strong evidence that care management might be effective at reducing costs for some subgroups of dual eligibles, such as those with severe chronic illnesses or at high risk for hospitalization. However, the estimates of potential net savings from these interventions are typically modest.”

A small number of new programs have reduced hospital admissions for dual-eligibles. Part of the cost, in some cases, came from government incentives for providers to try the new method.

The study said the top projects segregated dual-eligibles by exact healthcare needs. For more on the study, click here.

 

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