Kaiser: Long-term care accounts for nearly one-third of all Medicaid spending in the United States

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Deficit-reduction plan to gain $600 billion from lower provider payments and higher beneficiary prem
Deficit-reduction plan to gain $600 billion from lower provider payments and higher beneficiary prem
Long-term care consumed more than a third of the $320 billion spent on Medicaid services during fiscal year 2007, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation report.

Most of the $109 billion spent on long-term care went to nursing homes ($47.8 billion), followed by home and personal care ($43.6 billion), ICF-MR services ($12.4 billion) and mental health facilities ($4.8 billion). The report found that the federal government paid 57% of the total, with the remaining 43% falling on states.

Nearly $195 billion (61%) of all Medicaid funding was used to cover acute care services, while another $15.9 billion (5%) went to disproportionate share hospital payments. In all, $319,676,945,585 was spent on Medicaid. The totals are based on data provided by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Analysis was jointly conducted by the Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured and the Urban Institute.

For state-specific information, visit http://www.statehealthfacts.org. Go to the category "Medicaid & CHIP."
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