Johns Hopkins surgeon implants 1st U.S. brain 'pacemaker' for Alzheimer's disease

Share this article:

In an effort that is hoped to boost memory and reverse the mental slide of Alzheimer's sufferers, surgeons placed a pacemaker-like device into the brain of a patient in the early stages of the disease. The November operation was the first of its kind in the United States. The federally funded surgery could ultimately instigate a change of course for Alzheimer's treatments, especially after some recent drug trial failures, observers believe.

The implanted device provides deep brain stimulation via low voltage electrical charges and has been used in patients with Parkinson's disease. A second patient is scheduled for the procedure this month, according to reports. The surgeries are being performed by neurosurgeon William S. Anderson, M.D.

Approximately 40 patients are expected to receive the deep brain stimulation implant at Johns Hopkins and other North American facilities.

Share this article:

More in News

ACO bill in House would waive 3-midnight requirement for skilled nursing care

Certain Accountable Care Organizations would be able to send Medicare beneficiaries to a skilled nursing facility without a prior hospital stay under a bipartisan bill recently introduced in the House of Representatives.

Increasing staff-to-patient ratios improves nurse safety, researchers find

A law setting mandatory nurse-to-patient staffing ratios has reduced the number of workplace injuries for registered nurses and licensed practical nurses in California, according to recently published findings.

Life Care Centers takes Gold in Transitions category

Life Care Centers takes Gold in Transitions category

Life Care Centers of America has won the Gold Award in the McKnight's Excellence in Technology Awards in the Transitions category.